About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
CNN 12
CSPAN 11
MSNBC 10
CSPAN2 6
WHUT (Howard University Television) 5
KTVU (FOX) 4
WMAR (ABC) 3
WMPT (PBS) 3
KGO (ABC) 2
KNTV (NBC) 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
WETA 2
WTTG 2
KICU 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 77
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)
." >> a second explosion at the damaged fukushima at -- power plant and 11 people are injuried. japan offers assurances that risks remain low. tens of thousands of people are still missing amidst the race of trying to find loved ones. >> hello and welcome. also in this program, japan's stocks tumble. they take emergency action by pouring in cash to the market. >> japan's nuclear crisis appears to be deepening. in the last few hours, there has been a second explosion at the fukushima nuclear plant. speaking in the last hour, japan's cabinet secretary said the risk of today's explosion caused an uncontrolable leak of radiation is low. but the u.s. said it had moved away from the area after one of its aircraft carriers detected low-level radiation 160 kilometers off shore. tens of thousands of people have been evacuated from the area. let's go to my correspondent who is in japan in the sendai area with all the very latest. >> hello to you. you join me on the outskirts of sendai city. this main wall behind me is where the wall of tsunami, sea water, washed up about a half a mile from the harbor
for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to install a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter planes will be brought in to help those wanting to leave the country. charlie d'agata is in yoshida, japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wondering where i am. we've been trying to make our way to the quake zone. the japanese military has taken over all the highways. obviously we're trying to steer clear of the nuclear power plant. we had to cut through the moun
comments@captioncolorado.com >> couric: tonight, emergency workers return to japan's crippled nuclear plant after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but
where you left off. more than ever, when we talk about the nightmare in japan, we're really talking about two nightmares. the nuclear one and everything else. again today, fire broke out at that devastated fukushima daiichi plant. and another blast of radiation escaped, for reasons still not entirely clear. the few remaining workers had to leave but they came right back in even greater numbers when the danger eased. this crisis stems from overheated fuel rods but elsewhere in japan, a cold snap, including snow, adding to the misery. searching, supporting, surviving, all of it is made more grueling because of the weather. officially the death toll topped 4,000, with more than 8,000 considered missing. this woman is scouring the rubble for her uncle. she thought she may have found his shoe. the nation heard from the emperor, reserveder pot direst of national emergencies. the emperor act key per act hes heart is broken. the volunteer utility workers who have been exposed to life-threatening radiation levels ots fukushima daiichi. their company hasn't released personal information abou
at a nuclear plant in the earthquake-devastated region of japan. the japanese government is confirming a radiation leak has happened. and they are fighting against a nuclear meltdown. we have a live report for you from tokyo ahead. >> the massive earthquake triggering a ripple effect across the pacific hitting hawaii and governor brown if california call for a state of emergency along the northern coast including in santa cruz. >> in japan, the third largest producer of nuclear power and how trouble at the nuclear reactor could devastate global markets. friend friend hour two begins right now. >> good morning, everyone, thank you for joining us. and now you need to say glued to the show for three hours because there is so much breaking news including what is going on in japan. they are racing to prevent a meltdown after an explosion at the largest nuclear plant. the nation is getting a look at the destruction. you can see the images. >> these are new images as crews are getting out to assess the damage. adam housley is on the ground in tokyo assessing what is going on. tokyo is the sta
that there hasn't been a broader call for help from japan may have something to do with it. relief efforts right now are focused on immediate needs like food, water and medical care. all goods and services that can be purchased locally. internationally charities like the red cross, world vision and save the children are on the ground doi ining exactly that already. that's why cash donations now directed at those charities may be the best thing americans can do to help the victims when their need is the most. for more information, go to cnn.com/impact. >>> that's it for me. brooke baldwin takes over now with "newsroom". >>> my promise to you, we won't get too far from japan chblt we'll get to the new images and information there in just a moment. >>> first, i want you to listen to what secretary of state hillary clinton has now just told cnn's wolf blitzer. >> we don't want any ambiguity. only the security council can authorize action, and if they do authorize action, there needs to be a true international response, including arab leadership and partnership. >> wolf is traveling right along with
of positive news in japan's struggle to avoid a nuclear meltdown. we're just getting word that a new power line to the truck fukushimi -- >> reporter: crews tried to cool reactors after white clouds drifting from one reactor believed to be leaking radiation forced japanese workers to temporarily eevacuate. >> translator: if the fuel rod gets exposed, it can become fragile and there is a chance of that rod breaking once any shock is given. >> reporter: japanese helicopters pulled out of wednesday's mission following the release of steam of the vessel of reactor number 3 which top government officials report was not damaged. during an extremely rare address to the nation, japan's emperor now address the crisis. >> translator: i'm deeply concerned about the nuclear situation because it's unpredictable. >> reporter: he offers con dole licenses to the victims of last -- con dole licenses to the victims of -- con dole licenses to the victims of the tragedy -- condolences to the victims of the tragedy last week. the quake hit, following a tsunami and survivors are still being found. >> the chanc
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
in that country. stocks continue to teeter, could japan's economy cause the u.s. to stumble? we'll look into that. moments ago, a new after shock described by our msnbc team in tokyo as huge and lasting a long time here, we'll hear from chris jansing on that in a home. the threat of a nuclear catastrophe still surrounds japan and a cloud of fear here. the world is watching closely those nuclear reactors at the fukushima plant. 50 workers were ordered out when things got dicey. now they're going back in at great personal risk to try and figure out how to get a handle on things. fires, explosions, and radiation leaks remain a constant threat. it seems no one can predict how this situation will end. the u.s. army trying to ramp up its humanitarian effort to help the people of japan. more than 10,000 people already listed missing or dead. half a million have been evacuated and the cost of the destruction could top $100 billion. the sato family was lucky enough to survive. but when they were returned to their neighborhood, they found there is nothing left for them, their entire town is destroyed, gone
. >>> here are the developments we're following this morning on the disaster in japan. president obama is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is p
. officials in japan hope the helicopter bucket brigade can keep the reactors from overheating while the plant operators scramble to install a power line and use electricity to restore the reactor's cooling systems. >>> now, less than an hour ago, word came that the united states will start evacuating americans from japan, including private citizens and the families of u.s. personnel. president obama informed japan's prime minister of the plans tonight. the obama administration is chartering aircraft to accommodate americans who want to leave. also today the chairman of the u.s. regulatory commission says radiation near the fukushima plant is extremely high and damage at one reactor and worse than the japanese officials have acknowledged. >> and janna katsuyama just returned hours ago from tokyo. she is here now live. but how are the people feeling there now? >> well, it is a difficult situation there. walking through tokyo, the trains and the stations and the airport, there wasn't really any signs of panic or chaos. but we did find many foreigners quietly leaving. driving from tokyo to hanita
in japan and beyond as a nation in i sis is forced to make very tough decisions. the battle for libya intensifying as rebels take a beating and government forces engage in nonstop shelling. will benghazi fall to moammar gadhafi. they are criticizing the president on not responding to issues at home and a broad. its all on "happening now." a good wednesday to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. we are here in the fox newsroom and happening right now as jon just mentioned brand-new developments in the nuclear crisis that is gripping japan and company company taourg all of our attention. emergency workers who have have now dubbed the fukushima 50 risking their lives to prevent further disaster. this after another fir fire has broken out at the nuke plant. radiation is 300 times normal. jon: the numbers today are staggering, millions across japan struggling with very little food and water. nearly half a million people there are homeless now, and some 3700 listed as dead, but that number sure will he will rise with ten thousand people still missing in one northeastern city alone. mar
) you heard people saying what's happening in japan so far is worse than three mile island, but not as bad as chernobyl, well, okay. it is good to understand that, but it is also good to understand that there's a lot of room between the consequences of three mile island and chernobyl. not just the magnitude and type of accidents themselves, but the consequences of those accidents. how much radioactivity was released, and what it did to people. the on-going crisis in japan is about trying to minimize the amount of radiation that's going to be released from the reactors at daiichi. understanding the difference between this disaster and previous nuclear disasters is empirical. it is understandable even if you're not a physicist. i certainly am not. we have six reactors in japan together at daiichi. three of them, numbers one, two, and three were on, were producing power when the earthquake hit. they automatically shut down, now it has been a matter of keeping enough water flowing into the cooling systems of the reactors to keep the hot radioactive fuel rods covered up so they
plant in japan. right now, emergency workers are risking their lives to prevent a complete nuclear meltdown. crews began the first of four helicopter water drops. at the same time, workers on the ground are using a water cannon meant for riots to shoot water directly into one of the reactors. it is a desperate last ditch effort to keep spent nuclear fuel rods from melting. in a potentially troubling sign white steam was again seen rising from three of the reactors. radiation levels at the plant dangerously high. japan's electric company is working desperately to reconnect power at the plant today. meantime, damning reports about the owner of the japanese power plant. accord to the australian, the owner falsified safety data and said in 1989 tokyo electric injected air into the containment vessel of a reactor number one to lower the leak rate and when caught apologized for "dishonest practices." now, abc's martha raddatz with the latest on the last ditch effort to saint planet. >>> 50 workers inside the plant working in the dark with nothing but flash lights wearing overalls and hea
's go back to dave and pam. >>> all right. thank you, sal. in japan helicopters are still dumping sea water on the earthquake damaged nuclear plant trying to prevent a meltdown. the helicopter crews can only work about 40 minutes at a time for their own safety to limit radiation exposure. now the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission says there's no more water in one of the spent fuel pools at the plant. increasing the chance of widespread nuclear fallout. however, japanese officials deny that that pool is dry. the u.s. government is now chartering airplanes to help evacuate u.s. citizens from japan because of the rising radiation levels. voluntary evacuation to family members of government employees. >>> time now 5:01. scientists here on the west coast are closely watching the movement of the radioactive plume coming from the crippled japanese nuclear reactors. it's expected to hit the illusion islands south of alaska some time today. that plume is then expected to reach southern california late tomorrow. the health experts are emphasizing radiation levels are plunging as th
on this site, there are life threatening doses of radiation. >> japan's emperor addressed his nation today. an extraordinary event reserved for times of war or dire national crises. he says he's touched by the japanese people's calm and order in the face of disaster. >>> well, foreigners scrambled to leave tokyo today. france is urging its citizens to get out now or at least head to southern japan. japan has lost control of fukushima. evacuees say they don't trust the japanese government to be forthcoming. >> i don't believe what i've been told. you know, people are evacuating. all foreigners are evacuating, large multi-national companies, foreign companies are evacuating. you don't really know what to believe. it's better to play it safe. >>> harrowing new video of the moments the tsunami struck. people scream as they try to outrun the water. >>> this is said to be ground zero for the tsunami. a coastal town home to 17,000 people. most are feared dead. a cnn i-reporter sent us this video at the moment the 9.0 earthquake struck. shot it at a tokyo department store. remember, tokyo is 230 m
disaster in the making in japan after a new blast rocks a new power plant there. also a deadly tour bus crash in new york and conflicting reports from the driver and passengers. this while we try to get to the bottom of what really happened. and rebel fighters hammered in libya as forces loyal to qaddhafi use warplanes to bomb stra taoepbl i can conditions. it's all now and live and "happening now" "happening now." we're go glad you are with us on this very busy monday morning. hi, everybody i'm jenna lee? i'm jon scott. "happening now" a new explosion at a japanese nuclear power plant raises fears of an all out meltdown. the fallout from that could reach across the pacific affectth west coast of the u.s. more powerful after shocks rocked japan today. a thousand bodies wash ashore on the devastated northeast coast of the country. raising the death toll officially now lis listed as tad 9.0 and the tsunami that hit just half wards. the details get worse by the day. >> reporter: absolutely. it's completely unbelievable. every day i go out it gets worse than the day before. i went down by t
>>> in japan helicopters are still dumping sea water on an earthquake damaged nuclear plant. the other efforts underway to prevent a meltdown. >>> a big chunk of highway 1 has collapsed and tumbled towards the pacific ocean. what crews are saying about how long it will be closed. >> reporter: the waves at mavericks have taken another life this morning. new details about the frantic efforts to pull the surfer from the water. >>> good morning to you. welcome to thursday. it's march 17th. it's st. patrick's day. i'm dave clark. >> good morning. i'm pam cook. thank you for joining us. let's check in with steve paulson. how does the weather look today? >>> good morning, pamela, dave, clear skies. patch or two of fog, some clouds to the north but over us right now clear and cold. 30s showing up. something we haven't seen for a while. sunshine for a while and then partly cloudy skies. if you're northward there are a few showers starting to move through. we'll talk about that plus a big change in our weather for friday. now sal with an update on traffic. >>> steve, right now on west
in libya, across the middle east and japan. wolf in washington. two. happening right now, breaking news. president barack obama warns libyan troops and moammar gadhafi to stop attacks against civilians or face military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands o
coming from japanese officials. >> events unfeeling in japan incident appears to be more serious than three-mile island. to what extent, we don't know now and as they're unfolding rapidly on an hour-by-hour, day- by-day basis and there are conflicting reports, so we don't know what is happening. >> reporter: at the white house, questions surveyed about the japanese government's honesty in dealing with the crisis and who americans should listen to. >> when there is a situation when our advice on what to do in reaction to this incident to protect your physical safety, if first from the advice the government of japan is giving, we'll give separate and additional advice to american citizens in japan. >> reporter: millions are struggling still with no electricity, little food, water or heat and in frigid temperatures, rescuers are trying to find survivors five days later, followed by a tsunamina thaswallowed entire towns, survivors are being found. >> chances of survival are small but we're doing our best. >> reporter: and foreigners are continueing to evacuate japan tonight. the death tol
the every-changing situation in japan. we'll have live updates on "america this morning" and later on "good morning america." also stay up to date any time at abcnews.com. >>> moving on to other news beginning with libya. four "new york times" journalists who have been covering the fighting there are now missing. pull its zero prize winning reporter anthony shadid, stephen farrell and photographers tyler hicks and linsey add dario were last heard from on tuesday. meanwhile, moammar gadhafi's forces have been battling rebels in a key city in eastern libya. there could be a vote today in the u.n. security council on whether to impose a no-fly zone over libya. >>> meanwhile, secretary of state hillary clinton was in cairo talking through an unscheduled stroll -- taking an unscheduled stroll through tahrir square, the symbolic center of egypt's revolution. she urged egyptians to not let extremists ruin what they've already accomplished. clinton saying she will not stay on as the nation's top diplomat if president obama is re-elected. she also says she has no interest in another run for the whit
in japan isç "out o control." meantime, u.s. forces operating in that country are being moved even further away from the power plant for safety. a live report from tokyo straight ahead. plus police and protesters face off in pakistan just hours after reports that the u.s. paid more than $2 million for the release of a cia contractor accused of murder. new comments on the situation from the secretary of state. >>> and he reached out online to people he never met in person convincing them to kill themselves. now a judge says the minnesota man in this picture must go to jail. >> it's not fair. it's not fair. >>> a push to rally in michigan. protesters still at odds with the state's governor over the budget join forces at the state capital. the latest in the on going standoff between public union workers in this country and some republican lawmakers. >>> i'm tamron hall. "news nation" is following new details on the nuclear crisis in japan. the secretary-general of the international atomic energy association says he's headed to japan as soon as possible as workers at the fukushima plant strugg
by the moment in japan as more radiation is spewing in the atmosphere from the damaged nuclear plant. david piper in the air base west of tokyo. good morning, david. >> martha: the nuclear crisis is a dangerous level now. the fukushima nuclear complex has had a number of a explosion and they are saying it is moving to a dangerous level and the international nuclear agency said that fire started in a storage plant that spent nuclear fuel. japanese officials told them the fire was out now because they reportedly had help from the u.s. military. radiation leveled have sored around the complex. japanese authorities told people to seal doors and winnows and stay in home and avoid going out at all. japanese prime minister said radiation is released from the three reactors from the nuclear plant and a high risk of more radiation coming out. reactors are over heat raising the risk. japan has imposed a no fly zone over the plant. high levels of radiation in tokyo and now reportedly dropping. but just outside of tokyo there are above the normal level by 10 times. back to you in the studio. >> martha:
." >> a new aftershock shakes japan as two workers at the fukushima nuclear plant are treated for high levels of radiation. the battle for libya goes on. france says it could take weeks, not months, to destroy gaddafi's military capabilities. parliament rejects austerity measures in portugal and the prime minister resigns. welcome to "bbc world news." i am david eades. also coming up in the program, the suicide bombing ritual acted out by children and posted as an online video. >> two workers at japan's fukushima nuclear power station have been taken to the hospital after they were exposed to high levels of radiation. the leak of radiation has already contaminated tokyo's water supply. authorities say that tap water is once again safe. in the last couple of hours, there's been a further strong aftershock. at a news conference just a short while ago, the japanese chief cabinet secretary was talking about what had happened to those two nuclear workers. >> yesterday at reactor building number three, workers were laying cables. the radiation levels have been monitored constantly. they stepped int
. >>shepard: i am shephard smith reporting from a frigid night from japan as the nuclear situation appeared earlier to be spinning out-of-control, and we are just getting word that the operator of the the tsunami crippled nuclear plant has almost complete add brand influence power line that could restore electricity to the complex and possibly solve the crisis. this as the head of the international atomic industry confirmed part of a meltdown if reactors one, two, and three of the crippled fukushima power plant calling the situation "very serious." and says he is headed to japan now to deal with the crisis in person. right now, it is difficult to get specifics about what exactly is happening inside the plant. we do know a fuel storage pond at one reactor is believed to be leaking radiation now. and there may be some damage to the containment vessel. crews are desperately trying to keep the fuel rods cool, to prevent them from burning through the concrete containers, and sending mass amounts of radioactive material into the atmosphere. japan's defense minister reports that shoppers had to ab
forced from benjawahd and regrouped. >>> japan working to keep reactors cool and try to prevent radioactive water from leaking to the ocean. tons of water to keep fuel from overheating have been contaminated with radiation. workers are using sandbags and concrete panels to hold back the water. >>> pakistan's cricket team have been practicing for a game for which their world cup, standing, and national pride are at stake. on wednesday, pakistan plays india. a big match helping to soothe often bitter relations. thousands of people are expected to skip work to watch the game. i'm zain verjee in london. "world business today" starts now. >>> good morning from cnn london. >> and good afternoon from cnn hong kong, i'm pauline chu. this is kporld business today. the top stories on this wednesday, march 30, tepco's troubles keep mounting up. now the company's president has been hospitalized, apparently suffering from stress. >> high fuel prices and natural disasters clip qantas' wings. how the australian airline is cutting back. >> and businesses in india and pakistan are bowled over by
spread to other parts of japan. it does not appear that it poses any threat to either hawaii or territories or the rest of the united states. >>> andrea mitchell just sat down with secretary of state hillary clinton in cairo. what she says about the crisis in japan, the wave of revolutions in the middle east and her surprise stop today in tahrir square. >> it's very exciting and very moving. and to see where this revolution happened and all that it has meantç to the world is extraordinary for me. >>> also this hour, our exclusive with senator kirsten gillibrand. what she's calling on the president to do in terms of ending the war in afghanistan. >>> good day, everybody, i'm nora o'donnell live in washington. andrea's completed interview is straight ahead. >>> we begin with japan. first the human toll. six days after the quake and tsunami, the official figures stand at 4,164 dead. 7,843 missing. the total now more than 12,000. at the fukushima nuclear plant, workers are desperately trying to cool the reactors. two reactors are believed to have been damaged. two more are at r
americans who are in japan it is time to consider getting out today, thursday, march 17th, 2011. >> from nbc news, this is a special edition of "today," disaster in japan with matt lauer and meredith vieira. live from studio 1a in rockefeller plaza. >> good morning. welcome to "today" on a thursday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm savannah guthrie in for meredith who is on assignment. a sign of how desperate things are in japan that they are willing to try such a long shot. helicopters dropping water from the air. >> want to take a look at the video right now. as you can see when they do that a significant amount of that water seems to be dispersed by the wind. now massive high pressure water cannons, the kind you have seen police use on rioters will be used to hoes dose down the reac from the ground. more on this desperate attempt just ahead. >>> growing disagreement today between officials in japan and here in the u.s. over the severity of the situation. the chair of the u.s. regulatory commission believes a storage pool holding highly radioactive spent fuel rods may be completely empty at
to "washington journal" on this wednesday, march 16, 2011. the latest from japan -- "the new york times" headline -- "second reactor may have ruptured." first, let's start with the war in afghanistan. do you think it is worth fighting? a "the washington post" abc news poll says 2/3 of americans say it is not. the numbers -- we also have a line set up for active duty military. you can also e-mail us and we are on twitter. we will read your tweets on the air this morning. this is the story in "the washington post" yesterday looking at the war in afghanistan. "the afghan war is not worth fighting, most in the u.s. say." host: what do you think? is the war in afghanistan worth fighting? do you think it has been productive so far? if you think this time for a pullout? fairfax, virginia. jack joins us. good morning. caller: good morning. i had a comment about the war and one other comment. i do not think it is worth fighting. we're spending $2 billion per week and countless companies are just taking this money. it cannot be accounted for. that is why i think the republicans are all four wards because t
night here in japan. the snows were very heavy around the most seriously affected areas. so you have all the people without heat, without electricity. food and water supplies remain very low as do gas supplies. it is tough for people to get around, although they did have some buses of people, evacuees they were able to take out of the immediate area. and they're continuing to test people, including babies for radiation contamination. but red cross workers, other international aid organizations, they're being very cautious right now. they have actually pulled back a little farther away from the nuclear plant. obviously they want to protect the health and safety of their workers as they try to deal with this humanitarian crisis. thomas? >> chris jansing in tokyo for us. chris, thanks so much. >>> the radiation released from nuclear power plants raises concerns about whether wind conditions will spread the radiation to other regions. jennifer car fog kncarfagno has tracking the winds for us. let's talk about what chris was reporting about the dangerous freezing temperature s that some peopl
: "fox and friends" starts right now. >> martha: the last on the story out of japan. workers in the failed nuclear physicists riactor site are getting set to go back to work. one report said the workers niver left that site and then reports that they evacuated 50 corgous people who were staying there to try to cool the nuclear physicists reactors . we have had conflicting reports. >> brian: four of those men are missing. they were working on one of the reactors. we'll follow up on that. >> martha: unbelievable story . new pictures show at least two of the plant's reactors are completely destroyed . we have seen the araeil shots . trying to figure out what to do next to prevent a complete meltdown there. >> brian: when tempco was fulling -- pulling out the prime minister demanded what was going on and demanded they go back. >> steve: we'll go to ykoto air force base. david piper is standing by. >>reporter: the new crisis piraling oust control. in a desperate move japanese military helicopter was sent up with a huge bucket of water to dump it on the fukushima plant. they had to
to the latest developments in japan. there were two more earthquakes measuring over 6.0 in the south and north of japan last night, killing four people. these on top of the dozens of aftershocks from last friday's historic 9.0 quake. the death toll from the earthquake and the following tsunami could be more than 10,000. >> the aftershocks leekly to continue. we get more on the latest dangers at the damaged nuclear plant from fox 5's sherry ly live in the news room. good morning, sherry. >> reporter: good morning, tony. those emergency workers have been ordered to return to the nuclear power plant after they were evacuated this morning. that cost valuable time. in a rare address to the nation. the japan emperor said he was concerned and urged people not to give up, but conditions at the nuclear power plant seem to be worsening. yet another fire at japan's fukushima nuclear plant and a spike in radiation levels forced the 50 remaining workers there to seek shelter and at least temporarily suspend their work to cool down reactors. >> i think the very imminent dangers to those people that live aro
they're there. >> and in japan, tsunami ghost town. a study that was -- city that was once home to 10,000 abandoned by rescuers. i'll talk to one of the few people left behind. this is a special live edition of "piers morgan tonight" in new york. good evening. more and more extraordinary videos are emerging from libya today. most of them shocking in their graphic violence. they show how desperate the battle for the country has become. take a look at this. [ crowd noise ] [ gunfire ] >> cnn can't independently confirm where and when these videos were shot. our best information is that this one shows street fighting in tripoli and benghazi in recent days. as you can see, the fighting escalates from gunshots to hand-to-hand combat. we also have this very disturbing video which appears to show the bodies of an entire family killed in misurata. it was uploaded to youtube earlier today. tonight we're covering breaking news all over the globe. live reports from the very best of cnn's correspondents from the middle east to japan. >>> we begin with the crisis in libya. and two leaders head to
been talked -- touched by the magnitude until this disaster are closely following the events in japan and the repercussions in this country and in many other countries. before we begin, i would like to offer my sincere condolences to all of those who have been affected by the earthquake and the tsunami in japan. our hearts go out to all lead in dealing with the aftermath of these natural disasters. we are mindful of a long and difficult road they will face in recovering. we know the people of japan are resilience and strong and we have every confidence that they will come through this difficult time and move forward with resolved to rebuild their vibrant country. i believe i speak for all americans when i say that we stand together with the people of japan at this most difficult and challenging time. the nrc is a relatively small agency. we play a critical role in protecting american people and the environment when it comes to the use of nuclear materials. we have our inspectors to work full time as every nuclear plant in the country and we are proud to have world top scientists, engi
. immediately you get the question, you design against those, but look at japan. if you had an earthquake with a magnitude of nine, how does one answer that question? you could always have and 9.5 occur. is there a rational way of addressing that? >> my explanation is one i know you understand. we look that up faults around the u.s. and have that information's. look at the historical record, but that the maximum earthquake, and with everything we do, we add margins, but we also looked at the specific location in relation to the fault. we considered the kinds of soil and rock formations between the fault location and the site, and analysis to see the ground motion that would actually be seen at the site. and we design for an earthquake of a certain size. i am falling into the trap of saying of a certain size, of the ground motion of a certain magnitude. having said that, with all these other things, severe accident management guideline, the b five b procedures, we have procedures and equipment in place that says, even if we were wrong and the plant suffered this serious event, we have in f
military? how does it end? >>> then, disaster in the pacific. nuclear nightmare scenario in japan. how prepare sd is united states? could it happen here? libya and japan, two crises with major consequences for the united states. >> as we begin or broadcast, the united states is at war in a third muslim country, libya. we'll take you there live in a moment. abc's team of correspondents is covering every angle of the story. i'll have an exclusive interview with moammar gadhafi's son, saif. i'll be joined here in the studios by chairman mike mullen. >>> but first, the latest headlines in the fast-moving story. a defiant moammar gadhafi is promising a long war, one day after the united states and a broad international coalition launched military strikes on his country. british and american ships and submarines fired 112 cruise missiles on more than 120 targets on the coast. b-2 bombers took out targets. they're plans to impose a no-fly zone to keep him from firing on his own people. sunday, tripoli shook with explosions and ant aircraft fire. libyan state television reported that 48 people
their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think of this particular instance with the united nations out suggesting military force is appropriate in libya? caller:
. >> darya: in japan workers are trying to cool the plant where they were evacuated today after smoke rose from the damaged reactor. the cause of the smoke is unclear, the agency says the operator of the complex repeatedly had failed to be crucial inspections of equipment. in the weeks before that the plant was crippled by the earthquake in tsunami. workers have tried to spray the reactors with concrete. one of the several efforts to curb their release. instead of spreading water they are to bring concrete. it would only come into play if water does not cool the reactor spirit this is the latest we do we have. after week of blowing from the no west, when have now shifted threatening to blow radiation to more populated areas to the south. the pattern with the winds blowing from the north east through much of japan is expected to continue through tomorrow. that could carry material on shore from the facility, 150 mi. north of tokyo. >> reporter: monitoring some live pictures at of rockville md.. this is the commission meeting right now one of the things, that they came up with so far is that
in japan, more fears as the damaged nuclear plant spike at 3,000 times the normal level. >>> rebels in libya face more setbacks in the push against moammar gadhafi's forces. u.s. president barack obama says he will not rule out arming the rebels. >>> a decisive moment in syria, the world is waiting to hear what the president will say one day after his cabinet quit. bashar assad will "face the nation" and has been lying low after two weeks of violent clashes between security forces and anti-government protests. thousands have been killed. and they poured into the capital tuesday. it is said the president could be about to lift the emergency law in place since 1963. he will bring you the address live as soon as it begins. >> right now, we're joined by hala gorani. you interviewed the spokesman from the embassy. good to see you. did he say anything about what we can expect bashar to say? >> we have spoken to embassy members and others and we are expecting bashar al-assad to lift the state of emergency that has been in place longer than he has been alive, 1962, the baathi baathi baathis
and responsibly. information is still coming in about the events unfolding in japan, but the administration is committed to learning from japan's experience as we work to continue to strengthen america's nuclear industry. >> rose: and then by telephone, ethan brawner of the "new york times" in bahrain. >> it's hard to imagine how they can get back out in the streets quickly. the tanks and the jeeps are out this very important places in great strength. again, on the other hand, bahrain really relies on the financial district and so on to have a normal life, and i think that they're going to have to end the curfew and the marshal law quality at some point. >> rose: we conclude this evening with a look at the continuing crisis in the middle east and north africa with rob malley, john negroponte, and zalmay khalilzad. >> i think what mrs. : clts has done, secretary clinton, has been to hold back on the idea of us stepping forward unilaterally on this but saying, look, if we get the requisite support from the international community, including the arab league, then the predicate has been set for
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)